Here are some colour scans using the VuPoint Handheld Scanner on high (600x600 dpi) resolution. NOTE: the linked images are very large (approx ~5000 pixels across), which might bring your computer to a crawl if you don't have much RAM!

Kitchen Counter Top (note that there may have been some crumbs on it when it was scanned!)

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Cupboard Door

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Egyptian Papyrus, behind Lexan sheet

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A page of "Moby Dick", without Lexan sheet. Notice how I was unable to get the text from the right-hand edge (the right-hand margin is approx ~14mm wide) due to the fact that the rollers must be rolling in order for the scanner to scan!

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A page of "Moby Dick", with Lexan sheet (1mm thick). The sheet allowed me to scan the whole page, but note the increased blurring.

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The "Moby Dick" page (scanned with the Lexan sheet) after running through ScanTailor (your browser must support the TIFF image format to view this).

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The result of running Google's open-source "Tesseract" (v3.01) OCR program on the TIFF from ScanTailor:

  C H A P T E R l 0 8
Ahab and the Carpenter
rue DECK——l-‘IRST NIGHT WATCH
(Carpenter standing before his vice-bench, and by the light of two lanterns
busily filing the ivory joist for the leg, which joist is fixed in the
vice. Slabs of ivory, leather straps, pads, screws, and various tools of all
sorts lying about the bench. Forward, the red flame of the forge is seen,
where the blacksmith is at work. )
rat the file, and drat the bone! That is hard which should
be soft‘, and that is soft which should be hard. So we go,
who file old jaws and shinboncs. l.et’s try another. Aye,
now, this works better (sneezes). llalloa, this bone dust is (sneezes)
—why it’s (sneezes)—yes it's (sneezes)—bless my soul, it won’t let
me speak! This is what an old fellow gets now for working in dead
lumber. Saw a live tree, and you don’t get this dust; amputate a
live bone, and you don’t get it (sneezes). Come, come, you old Smut,
there, bear a hand, and let’s have that ferule and buckle-screw; l’ll
be ready for them presently. Lucky now (sneezes) there’s no knee-
joint to make; that might puzzle a little; but a mere shinbonc-
why it’s easy as making hop-poles; only I should like to put a good
finish on. Time, time; ifl but only had the time, l could turn him
out as neat a leg now as ever (sneezes) scraped to a lady in a parlor.
Those buckskin legs and calves of legs l’ve seen in shop windows
wouldn’t compare at all. They soak water, they do; and of course
get rheumatic, and have to be doctored (sneezes) with washes and
lotions, just like live legs. There; before l saw it off, now, I must
call his old Mogulship, and see whether the length will be all right;
  

So a few errors there, but nothing drastic - they might even be easily fixable just by training Tesseract on this particular font. Note that if your browser doesn't support UTF-8, then some characters (e.g. "’") may look corrupt: rest assured, they look fine in the produced text file, itself :)

Some of the errors may be directly traceable to the use of the Lexan sheet: contrast, for example, the bar in the "H" of "Halloa" with and without Lexan: with the latter, it is much fainter, and ScanTailor eradicates it almost completely, leading to the OCR error "llalloa". The "L" in "Let's try another" is similarly affected. It would be interesting to see if the problem is reduced by using a thinner sheet.

(In case you were wondering: skipping ScanTailor and just running Tesseract on the original JPEG file results in text which is more or less unsalvageable - if you are morbidly curious, the resulting "text" file is here.)


Update!

I'm embarrassed that I didn't think of this sooner: why not put the sheet behind the page? Here are the results for the same page of Moby Dick, using this technique:

A page of "Moby Dick", with the sheet behind the page. Now I can scan the whole page, and there's no blurring!

(Click for large)

The "Moby Dick" page (scanned with the Lexan sheet behind the page) after running through ScanTailor (your browser must support the TIFF image format to view this).

(Click for large)

The result of running Google's open-source "Tesseract" (v3.01) OCR program on the TIFF from ScanTailor:

 C H A P T E R 1 0 8
Ahab and the Carpenter
THE DECK—FIRST NIGHT WATCH
(Carpenter standing before his vice-bench, and by the light of two lanterns
busily filing the ivory joist for the leg, which joist is firmly fixed in the
vice. Slabs of ivory, leather straps, pads, screws, and various tools of all
sorts lying about the bench. Forward, the red flame of the forge is seen,
where the blacksmith is at work.)
rat the file, and drat the bone! That is hard which should
Dbe soft‘, and that is soft which should be hard. So we go,
who file old jaws and shinbones. Let’s try another. Aye,
now, this works better (sneezes). Halloa, this bone dust is (sneezes)
—why it’s (sneezes)—yes it’s (sneezes)—bless my soul, it won’t let
me speak! This is what an old fellow gets now for working in dead
lumber. Saw a live tree, and you don’t get this dust; amputate a
live bone, and you don’t get it (sneezes). Come, come, you old Smut,
there, bear a hand, and let’s have that ferule and buckle-screw; I’ll
be ready for them presently. Lucky now (sneezes) there’s no knee-
joint to make; that might puzzle a little; but a mere shinbone—
why it’s easy as making hop-poles; only I should like to put a good
finish on. Time, time; if I but only had the time, I could turn him
out as neat a leg now as ever (sneezes) scraped to a lady in a parlor.
Those buckskin legs and calves of legs I’ve seen in shop windows
wouldn’t compare at all. They soak water, they do; and of course
get rheumatic, and have to be doctored (sneezes) with washes and
lotions, just like live legs. There; before I saw it off, now, I must
call his old Mogulship, and see whether the length will be all right;
  

Far fewer errors - damn near perfect, in fact! Using this technique, I can generally scan 200-300 pages in an hour.